Age-related Macular Degeneration

Age-related Macular Degeneration and your eye health:

Have you noticed the older you get the worse your eyes are getting?  Is part of someone’s face missing when you look at them across the breakfast table?

If you are looking at someone and cannot see part of their face, or reading and having trouble seeing part of the words or sentences, you could be developing a common problem we sometimes get as we age (as if we need something else to complain about!).  If we have to put a big word to it, it is called Macular Degeneration. Specifically, age-related macular degeneration.

You have probably looked at Web MD already, but here is their definition they provide:

“Macular degeneration is the leading cause of severe vision loss in people over age 60. It occurs when the small central portion of the retina, known as the macula, deteriorates. The retina is the light-sensing nerve tissue at the back of the eye. Because the disease develops as a person ages, it is often referred to as age-related macular degeneration (ARMD). Although macular degeneration is almost never a totally blinding condition, it can be a source of significant visual disability.”

We are seeing this earlier and earlier in adult life. A cause could be all of the screens we stare at most of the day. Our computers, phones, tablets and televisions could be a factor in the growth of cases later in life as well. I will write a blog article devoted to my findings on this topic very soon…. Stay tuned.  There are two types of Macular Degeneration; Dry Form and Wet Form. I can explain this in “real terms” when you come and see me. Mentioning this blog post will get you major brownie points. Heck, I might even give you a brownie.

Age-related macular degeneration can be detected by a routine eye exam with me, Richard Wilkerson. How will I know if you have signs of macular degeneration? I will be able to see little yellowish deposits under the retina or the clumping of pigments during your exam.  If you have macular degeneration, you may notice a blind spot or distortion of letters and words near the center of what you are reading.

After reading this, do you think you have macular degeneration? Schedule an appointment and let me talk you through your options and how I can help!